Updates to Finngreek and Helleno-Uralic Theory!

I apologize for the long delay! As always, new word proposals continue to be posted on our Reddit page and Discord server. The Finngreek Youtube channel is temporarily on hiatus, but will become active again sometime later this year. Updates are currently being made to Helleno-Uralic Theory – the basis for the Finngreek language – and I wanted to make this information available to all of you.

Those of you who have followed Finngreek from the beginning know that a multitude of major revisions have taken place regarding the structure of the language and the dissemination of its underlying research. After more than 1.5 years spent on this project, what started as a pipe dream inspired by 90s Finnish pop music has, through a great deal of trial and error, blossomed into a working theory of comparative historical linguistics regarding potential lexical and morphological exchanges between the Uralic and Hellenic languages. However, there is still a lot of work to be done:

– The standardization of Helleno-Uralic orthography and etymological proposals has been (mostly) completed: And this will be reflected in upcoming proposals. Previous proposals will also be reposted over time to reflect these changes. The new Helleno-Uralic orthography – and reconfiguration of proposals – will be explained in an upcoming post.

– A comprehensive introduction to Helleno-Uralic Theory is under development. This introduction will categorize proposals by morphology; and focus on regular phonological diachronica, as well as proposed Helleno-Uralic revisions to Proto-Uralic reconstructions. Upon completion, it will be made available as a PDF.

– Regarding new proposals, focus has for now been shifted away from Finnish, Sami, and Proto-Uralic; and towards Mari, Mordvinic, Permic, Samoyedic, and Ugric. Current studies primarily involve Mari vocabulary, morphology, phonology, and dialectal variation.

If you are a speaker of a Uralic language or a Uralicist, your input is always encouraged and appreciated! That’s all for now. Kídos, sǻmata!

Finngreek Sentences 1

Sentences help to build Finngreek reading skills while comparing the Finnish and Greek languages through simple phrases. The Finnish and Greek appearing in these comparisons is not always grammatically correct, as the emphasis is on the vocabulary itself. Please only use these texts to learn Finngreek.

It’s such a dim night =
On tosi hämärä yö
On tosi hamará pye
Όν τόση αμαυρά πύη

Your sense of smell is keen =
Haistisi sun on kärkevä
Haisthisi su on hakrivǽ
Αίσθηση σου όν ακριβής

I’ll need a drink of mead, thanks =
Tarvitsen mehi-juoma, kiitos
Tárphthen methipjóma, kídos
Τάρφθην μέθη-πώμα, κύδος

I want a drink of mead, thanks =
Tahdon mehu-juoma, kiitos
Tátto methupjóma, kídos
Τάττω μέθυ-πόμα, κύδος

See the sun shine =
Näe päivän lämmetä
Nóe phoivon lámpesthæ
Νόε φοίβον λάμπεσθαι

I see the sun shine =
Näen auringon palaa
Nóen aurion phaná
Νόειν αύριον φανά

The mouth speaks, then the ear hears =
Suu puhuu sitten korva kuulee
Stúma phusó kíthen kórra klúe
Στύμα φυσά κείθεν κόρρα κλύει

The seer teaches to many =
Noita opettaa paljoihin
Noitá rophetáze poljoisin
Νοητά προφητάζει πολλοίσιν

The seer prophecies the result =
Noaidi* ennustaa tulos
Noitís ennustáze telos
Νοητής εννυστάζει τέλος

The tall tree always grows =
Pitkä puu aina kasvaa
Psiklé phué aéna havksáne
Ψηλή φυή αέναα αυξάνει

(*Noaidi is the North Sami form)




Finngreek Stories: The Fox and The Bear, Part 1

Finngreek Stories are designed to help readers learn the Finngreek language. These stories contain comparative texts in Finnish and Greek, to make learning easier. However, as Finngreek is based on ancient etymological comparisons, and has a different grammar from both languages, the Finnish and Greek texts appearing in these stories are not always grammatically correct. Please do not use these texts to study the Finnish and Greek languages: These texts are only for studying Finngreek.

The Fox and The Bear
Kettu ja Karhu
Kerdo ka Harku
Κερδώ και Αρκούδα

The fox is red, and the bear is dark.
Kettu on puna ja karhu hämärä on.
Kerdo on pura ka harku hamaraa on.
Κερδώ όν πυρρά και αρκούδα αμαυρά όν.

The red fox sees the berry-tree.
Puna kettu näkee marja-puun.
Pura kerdo noheei morja-phueen.
Πυρρά κερδώ νοέει μορέα-φυήν.

The dark bear sleeps, but then hears the fox.
Hämärä karhu nukkuu, mutta sitten kuulee ketun.
Hamaraa harku nukheuuei, muunno kiithen kluuei kerdon.
Αμαυρά αρκούδα νυχεύει, μούνο κείθεν κλύει κερδώ.

“Look, fox! It is my food.”
Näe, kettu! On ruoka mun.
Noe, kerdo! On rooga mu.
Νόε, κερδώ! Όν ρώγα μου.

“But I want it, bear! It is red, and a fox is red, so it is suitable for a fox.”
Mutta ton tahdon, karhu! On puna, ja kettu on puna, joten on oikeia kettuihin.
Muunno ton tatto, harku! On pura, ka kerdo on pura, pjothen on oikeia kerdoisin.
Μούνο τον τάττω, αρκούδα! Όν πυρρά, και κερδώ όν πυρρά, πόθεν όν οικεία κερδώισιν.

“It’s mine, fox, as a bear is strong.”
On mun, kettu, koska karhu on mahdikas.
On mu, kerdo, hos harku mahtikaa on.
Όν μου, κερδώ, ως αρκούδα μαχητικά όν.

“A bear is strong, but a fox is too smart.”
Karhu on mahdikas, mutta kettu on liian nokkela.
Harku on makhetikaa, muunno kerdo on liian noheraa.
Αρκούδα όν μαχητικά, μούνο κερδώ όν λίαν νοερά.

The fox awaits the morning-sun in the dark, thick mist.
Kettu odottaa aurinkoa hämärä paksu usmassa.
Kerdo rodokaa aurino hamaraa pakhu usmaesa.
Κερδώ προδοκά αύριον αμαυρά παχύς ύσμα έσω.

The bear sleeps again, as the sun is almost rising.
Karhu jälleen nukkuu, koska päivä melkein nostelee.
Harku pjallein nukheuuei, hos phoive mellein anostelleei.
Αρκούδα πάλιν νυχεύει, ως φοίβε μέλλειν αναστελλέει.

As the light shines, the fox again sees the red tree.
Koska palo palaa, kettu jälleen näkee puna puun.
Hos phano phanaa, kerdo pjallein noheei pura phueen.
Ως φανός φανά, κερδώ πάλιν νοέει πυρρά φυήν.

The fox finds that the bear has shut its eyes*, and then…
Kettu löytää karhu sulkee silmän, ja sitten…
Kerdo leyttei harku sunkleei thalmon, ka kiithen…
Κερδώ λεύττει αρκούδα συγκλείει οφθαλμόν, και κείθεν…

What will happen next? Stay tuned for Part 2!

NOTES:
– All words appearing in this story are considered etymologically related in one form or another, except for Finnish Ja and Greek Και (and), where a proposed connection is instead found with Finnish Kaa. This is the basis for Finngreek Ka(a), meaning ‘and/with, too’.
– Finngreek Harku can also be written as Harko, given Nganasan Ngarka. The actual comparison involved is Karhu = Harko = Άρκος, but since standard modern Greek uses Αρκούδα, Harku is also an acceptable form.
– Κερδώισιν (plural dative form of Κερδώ) is not an attested form, but is constructed based on other nouns with irregular -ώ(-ν, -ς) declension.
– *”Harku sunkleei thalmon” literally means “the bear shuts the eye”.






Hungarian-Hellenic Affinity: Teljes = Τelḗeis (Τελήεις)

(This post is not written as an article, but just notes about my proposal of affinity between the following Hungarian [and thereby Uralic] and Hellenic terms.)

teljes (also **tele/teli** for ‘full’):

entire, full, total

complete

τελήεις/telḗeis:

(of sacrificial victims) complete, perfect, entire, without blemish

(of animals and humans) full-grown, adult

Related to, and largely synonymous with…

τέλειος:

having reached its end, finished

(of victims) complete, perfect, entire, without blemish

(of animals and humans) full-grown, adult

(of persons) absolute, complete, accomplished, perfect

(of things)

(of prayers, vows, etc.) fulfilled, accomplished

(of numbers) full, complete

(in arithmetic) those numbers which are equal to the sum of their divisors

the third bowl offered to Zeus

(of the gods) perfect, omnipotent, infinite

last

(neuter substantive) a royal banquet

(feminine substantive) a full stop, period

(adverb) at last

completely, absolutely

The Hungarian is ultimately from Proto-Uralic *täwde, with cognates like Nganasan ťerə, Inari Sami tievâs, Finnisη täydellinen (‘perfect’, which I compare with reduplicated τετελεσμένος/tetelesmenos, ‘that which has been perfected’); while the Greek is from PIE *kʷel-. Out of all IE descendants, only Greek presents *kʷ>t. Furthermore, the semantic value of “full, complete” in Greek Τελήεις/Τέλειος does not appear present in IE cognate terms (from what is available on Wikipedia) descended from *kʷel-, itself meaning ‘to move/turn’. This is also the source of *kʷékʷlos > κῠ́κλος/kúklos , which I believe is related to Proto-Uralic *kuŋe, with the listed descendants:

Samoyedic: *kïj

Kamassian: ки (ki)

Ugric:

Hungarian: hó, hold

Mordvinic:

Erzya: ков (kov)

Finnic: *kuu

In Hungarian, telihold is the full moon. I believe the Greek equivalent would be τέλειε κύκλε (or perhaps τελήεν κύκλε). If Τele/Teli=Τελή/Τέλει- are related, Hungarian is phonologically closer to the Greek term than any other IE or Uralic language (with Khanty [also Ugric] tel a close second).