There are several ways to form plural nouns in Finngreek, based on the final vowel of the singular word:

If a noun ends in -o, its plural form is -a
If a noun ends in -a, its plural form is -ata
If a noun ends in -e, its plural form is -es
If a noun ends in -i, its plural form can be -es or -ia
If a noun ends in -u, its plural form is -us

Vano (light) > Vana (lights)
Usma (mist/rain) > Usmata (mists/rains)
Phute (tree) > Phutes (trees)
Lemmi (lake/pond) > Lemmes (lakes/ponds), Rjoki (river/stream) > Rjokia (rivers/streams)
Loipu (end/remain) > Loipus

These are not the only ways which nouns can be made plural: Depending on the context (irregular words; creative writing), other options appear. However, one can be fluent in Finngreek with just the above suffixes.

A NOTE ON ADJECTIVES
In Finnish and Greek, adjectives are co-suffixed with the number and case of the nouns they describe, meaning that the endings of adjectives match or complement the endings of nouns. However, this isn’t necessary in Finngreek: Adjectives may stay the same. For example:

Amaravano (Dim light) > Amaravana (Dim lights)
Vanaarhamaa (Old world) > Vanaarhamaata (Old worlds)
Mikkuuphute (Small tree) > Mikkuuphutes (Small trees)
Psiklaaksvi (Tall plant) > Psiklaaksves (Tall plants)
Pakusumpungu (Thick fog) > Pakusumpungus (Thick fogs)

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