While this is one of the first lessons, it is one of the more difficult ones for Uralic and Hellenic speakers, because some of the words are made without etymological comparisons.

What = Tima, Mja
Why = Midi
Where = Jodo
When = Kode
Who = Koja
How = Kon/Kos

Because = Midi, Kosa

-ever = doubled
Whatever = Timatima
Whyever = Midimidi
Wherever = Jodojodo
Whenever = Kodekode
Whoever = Kojakoja
However = Konkon

This = Toto/Tata, Tae
That, Those (pronoun) = Kinuo
That (conjunction) = Otto/Atta
Here = Taese
There = Tine/Tinnee, Eksiinne
Now = Nyn
Then = Tithen, Eksiithen, Pjothen

Examples
What is this? = Tima toto?; Mjaan tata?
Where is that? = Jodo an kinuo? or Jodo kinuoon? or Jodoon kinuo?
When is the rain? = Kode na (to) kataa?
Whenever is it Autumn, I am happy. = Kodekode na synkausi, idonimenom.
It is good that it’s not bad = Evaan otto den na hondo.
How are you? = Kon as? or Kossa?
Why is this good, and why is that bad? = Midi an toto hypae, hjae midi kinuo hondoon?
That was then, and this is now = Kinuoin eksiithen kaa tataan nyn
This was there, and that is here = Taein tinnee ka kinuoon taese

_______________________________________________________________________________________
Sources
What = Mitä = Tima, Mja = Ti/Ποιά
Why = Miksi = Midi (also “because”) = Επειδή
Where = Jonne/Jossa = Jodo = Η οδός (The way)
When = Kun = Kode = Κότε (Ionic)
Who = Jotka, Kuka = Koja = Ποιός, Κοία (Ionic)
How = Kuinka = Kon/Kos(a) (also “because”) = Κώς (Ionic)

This = Tää/Tätä = Tae, Toto/Tata = Αυτά/Τούτο/Ταύτα
That / Those (pronoun) = Nuo = Kinuo = Εκείνου
That (conjunction) = Että, Jotta (so that) = Atta/Otto = Άττα/Ότι
Here =
There = Sinne = Tine/Tinnee/Kine/Kiinne/Eksiinne = Τηνεί (Doric)<Εκείνος
Now = Nyt = Nyn = Νυν
Then = Joten = Tithen, Eksiithen, Pjothen (therefore) = Πόθεν

Many of the above terms are considered unrelated, but new words were created from the available terms. The Mi- root in Finnish does not have a clear comparison in Greek. Along with the majority of numbers, they are considered poor material for establishing a connection as it relates to Finngreek.

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